Augustana

Sioux Empire Podcast 129 Veteran’s Day With Garrett Gross from Age Media

On this very special patriotic episode of The Sioux Empire Podcast hosts Robert Mehling and Seth Glover welcome Garrett Gross from Age Media, he’s here to tell us about some of the extraordinary stories about Sioux Empire veterans he’s collected.

Over 60 Young Volunteers to Knock Doors on Election Day for LEAD

Sioux Falls, SD — LEAD (Leaders Engaged & Determined) South Dakota, a nonpartisan nonprofit founded to encourage South Dakotans become more engaged in the political process, has recruited over 60 volunteers for an Election Day event called “Donate a Day to Democracy.” Held on November 6th from 9:00am to 6:00pm at the Augustana Commons, this event will be used to increase voter turnout across Sioux Falls. A similar event in 2004 led to the highest voter turnout in the nation in Duluth, MN.

 

“We’ve seen an unprecedented number of people become involved in politics since the 2016 election,” said Susan Kroger, Co-Founder of LEAD South Dakota. “We’re excited about the new candidates running for office, and we believe that people are motivated to elect new leadership and many are unsure how to get involved. We’re ready for them.”

 

LEAD welcomes any and all volunteers to help with voter contact within Sioux Falls on Election Day. Volunteers are encouraged to pledge their participation at LEADtheVoteSD.org. 

 

Two ELCA Lutheran Congregations host first ifthar meal for Sioux Falls Muslim Community During Holy Month of Ramadan

June 14, 2018 Sioux Falls, SD: The digital sign in front of Augustana Lutheran Church/Pueblo de Dios read “Ramadan Mubarak to our Muslim neighbors” last night.  Nearly fifty Lutherans and Muslims gathered at Augustana Lutheran Church and Pueblo de Dios at sunset June 13, 2018 to celebrate the breaking of a fast on the 29th evening of the holy month of Ramadan.

Ramadan is the holiest of months in the Islamic calendar, where 1.7 billion Muslims worldwide/ and about 3000 Muslims in Sioux Falls, SD, abstain from food and drink from dawn (4AM) to sunset (9PM) for an entire month. It is a month of spiritual renewal, charity, and community building. “This was the first time the Muslim community has been invited by our Christian brothers and sisters to break fast during Ramadan. It was a significant night in furthering our relationships as religious communities and as neighbors,” said Taneeza Islam, executive director of SD Voices for Peace.

As members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), we share a responsibility for this church’s relationships with people of other faiths and traditions. We believe that the grace of God is an undeserved gift that re-orients our relationship with God. With that gift comes the invitation to love and serve the neighbor and we are freed to do so through Jesus Christ. “It is not just a recommendation that we love our neighbor — it is a commandment from Jesus,” said Bishop David Zellmer of the South Dakota Synod, ELCA.

The ELCA is committed to fostering unity among the children of God for the sake of the world. We will continue reach out to our multi-religious community to hold conversations and share a meal together again.

Ramadan ends tonight, June 14, 2018.  Tomorrow Eid Ul Fitr (pronounced Eeed-ul-fith’er), the most significant holiday in the Muslim calendar will be celebrated worldwide.  Congregational prayers will take place in the morning followed by food, presents and community.

The South Dakota Synod is one 65 synods in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, a church so deeply and confidently rooted in the Gospel of God’s grace that we are free to give our lives joyfully in witness and service. The South Dakota Synod consists of over 200 congregations across the state of South Dakota. Our vision is that that all may be fed.

Augustana Receives $1 Million Endowment Gift from David B. Jones Foundation

email

facebook

linkedin

twitter

google+

pinterest

Contact text

Kelly Sprecher

Director of Media Relations

605.274.5526

Body

Augustana University today announced a $1 million gift from the David B. Jones Foundation . The gift will be used toward the establishment of an endowed chair in anthropology/archeology and will support outstanding teaching, scholarship and service.

“Augustana is honored and deeply grateful to the David B. Jones Foundation for this significant gift to the University,” said President Stephanie Herseth Sandlin . “David Jones embodied the term ‘lifelong learner.’ He was curious about the unknown and was passionate about the study of history — particularly paleontology and archeology. This gift will ensure that future generations of students will have new and exciting opportunities to explore and discover those areas as well.”

While the gift is extraordinary, so, too, is the story of how David Jones came to know Augustana and why he chose to support the University through his foundation.

It all began about 20 years ago.

Adrien Hannus, Meet David Jones

It all started in the late 1990s when Jones walked into Augustana’s Archeology Laboratory one afternoon and introduced himself to Dr. Adrien Hannus .

Jones, who was in his early 70s at the time, didn’t offer much background about himself. He said his interest in fossils and dinosaurs prompted him to visit the Lab.

Hannus, who serves as a professor of anthropology and director of the Archeology Lab , did exactly what anyone who knows him would expect him to do — he smiled and offered Jones a cup of tea. From there, the two sat down and began a good conversation.

That’s the thing about Hannus — he loves a good conversation.

An established scholar, internationally known anthropologist, and TV star (he’s appeared on PBS’ “Time Team America” ), Hannus also has an intangible, quintessential ‘average Joe’ quality about him — a characteristic that makes him markedly approachable and easy to talk to.

With silver-streaked shoulder-length hair and his standard “uniform” of blue jeans and work boots, Hannus divides his time between the Archeology Lab (a building “guarded” by a life-size mammoth replica), field work and teaching — which he does on campus and at sites around the world, including the Thomsen Center Archeodome near Mitchell, South Dakota, and in the United Kingdom through Augustana’s exchange program with the University of Exeter.

Like Hannus, Jones enjoyed a good conversation, too.

A native of California, he completed high school in Wayzata, Minnesota, and later studied business at the University of Minnesota. He spent the majority of his career owning and operating a farm management business, all the while passionate about the study of ancient history.

At the age of 37, he enrolled in a college course in geology, which gave way to a lifelong interest in paleontology. During his career as an amateur paleontologist, he attended conferences and seminars across the country and conducted field research in Utah, Wyoming and South Dakota. For several decades, he participated in Boy Scout summer camps at the Lewis & Clark Scout Camp, located on the Missouri River near Yankton, South Dakota (where he eventually built a home).

Lunch at Inca

Hannus said that after that initial meeting, Jones began stopping by the Archeology Lab about once a month when he wasn’t traveling to conferences and dig sites. Those visits eventually gave way to monthly lunches at Inca, a restaurant located a few blocks from campus.

Conversation during those visits and lunches always focused on topics the two were interested in — archeology and paleontology.

“He just wasn’t the kind of guy you asked a lot of questions about, Hannus said. “Paleontology and archeology are enormous subjects — we never ran out of things to talk about.”

A few years after their first lunch, Hannus was at work in the Lab when the mail was delivered, including an envelope from Jones.

Inside was a $5,700 check to the Archeology Lab from the David B. Jones Foundation.

“I was shocked,” Hannus said. “I didn’t even know he had a foundation.”

At their next lunch, Hannus thanked Jones for his gift and attempted to learn a bit more about his background — and how it came to be that he had a foundation in his name.

Jones, however, was more interested in discussing paleontology and archeology. So, they talked about paleontology and archeology.

A few years later, in 2007, Jones stopped by the Lab one afternoon to see if Hannus would be interested in having lunch.

Lynette Rossum, office manager for the Lab, told Jones that Hannus wasn’t in. She went on to say he would be out for a while, due to the fact he’d just had triple bypass heart surgery.

Jones nodded, went out to his truck, and came back in with a $6,000 check, made out to the Archeology Lab from David B. Jones.

“Hopefully this will have a therapeutic effect,” Jones said at the time.

Hannus did get better and eventually the two resumed their monthly lunches at Inca. Jones also began to attend meetings of the South Dakota Archaeological Society at Augustana and visited Augustana’s field school at the Mitchell Prehistoric Indian Village.

Over time, Jones talked more about his foundation and its mission to “support research in paleontology, encourage writing and publication of articles relating to paleontology, and to support educational programs and training for young and amateur fossil hunters.”

To achieve its mission, the Foundation provide grants to domestic nonprofit organizations to further “educational, research and charitable activities working in the science of paleontology who primarily promote those activities within the United States of America.”

The Foundation was supported solely by Jones, who donated income he earned through his farm management operations and investments.

The fact that Jones gave his fortune away to others only further emphasized his humble nature, Hannus said.

“You never would have known he was a multimillionaire. He never wanted to be recognized for his worth. He wanted to be known for what he was passionate about.”

— Dr. Adrien Hannus

Professor of Anthropology

As time went by, Jones and Hannus continued their monthly lunches at Inca, eventually talking about the possibility of creating an endowed chair in anthropology/archeology at Augustana

In 2013, while visiting colleagues at the University of Exeter in England, Hannus received a message that Jones had died while on a paleontology dig in Wyoming.

Three years later, Hannus received word from the David B. Jones Foundation of its decision to make a $1 million gift to Augustana.

Word of the gift, Hannus said, was both overwhelming and humbling.

“This gift will create an enduring legacy in David’s name and will honor his passion for paleontology and his excitement for scientific discovery,” said Hannus. “We are deeply grateful to the Foundation for this extraordinary gift.”

In honor of his many contributions to Augustana, the field of anthropology, and the spirit of research and discovery, Hannus will serve as the first David B. Jones Endowed Chair.

On a personal level, Hannus said his unexpected friendship with Jones is something he’ll always cherish.

“I guess the moral of the story is if someone wants to talk with you, take time to listen. You can learn so much just by listening to and talking with other people,” Hannus said. “It’s really what this field of anthropology is all about — the study of people.”

Teaser/Lede

The gift will be used toward the establishment of an endowed chair in anthropology/archeology and will support outstanding teaching, scholarship and service.

Date

April 10, 2018

Lede Image

Access and Relatedness

News & Events See Also: Anthropology

Signing Event Gives Way to Creative Expression, Community

Augustana University Names Josh Morton Director of Athletics

In the News: Augustana Grad Named Director of Zeal Center for Entrepreneurship

King Named 2017-18 ASA Faculty Recognition Award Recipient

Augustana Receives $1 Million Endowment Gift from David B. Jones Foundation

Augustana Receives $1 Million Endowment Gift from David B. Jones Foundation

Signing Event Gives Way to Creative Expression, Community

Signing Event Gives Way to Creative Expression, Community

Signing Event Gives Way to Creative Expression, Community

email

facebook

linkedin

twitter

google+

pinterest

Contact text

By Chloe VanGerpen ’20

Chloe VanGerpen is a journalism, communication and media studies major from Avon, South Dakota.

Body

Planning for the upcoming Burst of Sign event , members of Augustana’s Deaf Awareness Club find an opportunity for creative expression and community building.

Students walked quickly into the Madsen Center as chapel bells sang 6 p.m. Their footsteps echoed as they walked upstairs to the American Sign Language (ASL) lab for a silent supper, beckoned by the smell of pizza. The first to arrive were upper-level signers communicating in ASL. Their hands sliced swiftly through the air as they chatted.

Augustana Deaf Awareness (ADA) Club members gathered around a circular table and greeted each student who entered. Club president Naomi Miller updated students on Burst of Sign. Then with a nod and smile, Miller transitioned into ASL and students followed her lead. For the next two hours, students’ hands held the conversation.

The silent supper began as a meeting for ADA club members to discuss Burst of Sign , the organization’s annual performance for the Deaf community, set for Friday, April 27, and Saturday, April 28, on campus. Miller shared details already set and listed tasks that needed to be completed. Miller’s hands moved naturally in front of her as she spoke.

Miller spoke aloud for 10 minutes, during which time the attendees were reserved. As Miller spoke, her hands moved in ASL. After finishing the Burst of Sign updates, Miller required members to communicate in sign only.

The subsequent silence brought the interpreters to life.

Students separated into small groups and chatted. They signed with speed and efficiency, hands pausing only to pick up a slice of pizza. Their signs were confident and constant — a contrast to the motionless, quiet students seated in a circle only 15 minutes before.

The attendees abandoned their roles as Augustana students and transformed into interpreters. For a few hours, their hands and faces told the story. As students signed, their faces became animated and the lab filled with laughter.

“The reason I become more confident and break out of my shell is because, for that moment, I get to be someone else,” said Sydney Cain, ADA vice president. “I’m not Sydney, I’m whoever is speaking or signing at the moment. It’s really fun to be someone else for a little while.”

Creative Expression, Community

In planning for the Burst of Sign event , members of Augustana’s Deaf Awareness Club are expressing their creativity, building confidence, and creating friendships with fellow classmates.

A circle of nine students in the lab shared their names, majors and hometowns. Only two were interpreting majors , but most were ADA Club members. Three students attended as a requirement for ASL 111.

Any Augustana student is welcome to volunteer to perform in Burst of Sign as solo acts or groups, Miller said. The acts are performed for the ADA Club president, vice president and faculty adviser before being accepted into the performance.

“We watch that what they’re doing is appropriate and give suggestions if they’re not sure what to do,” Miller said.

The ADA Club began planning Burst of Sign in January, Miller said. The club meets weekly for 30 to 45 minutes.

Burst of Sign participants read poetry, dance in group songs, perform skits, tell jokes and share stories.

Audience members do not need to know ASL to benefit from Burst of Sign, Ally Miller, ADA Club public relations manager, said. AU alumni who are also professional interpreters will be present to translate.

In the lab that blustery March evening, the interpreting majors appeared to step into their comfort zones when Naomi Miller called for silence.

“The expression in the language helps you to become more comfortable with your body movements and in how you express yourself. Being an interpreter strengthens my confidence by allowing me to just be comfortable with who I am.”

— Ally Miller ’19

Woodbury, Minnesota

Her comfort was echoed in the lab as students stood close together, frequently touching one another on the shoulder or smiling at comments.

“I’ve met so many amazing and supportive people from the start of this career journey,” junior interpreting major Mikayla Magnuson said. “That has helped me come out of my shell and become more expressive.”

Students mingled for an hour, then regrouped to discuss Burst of Sign.

Music for the Ears and Eyes

The meeting attendees pulled their chairs into a circle. Slips of paper were distributed for students to vote for a song. While the students waited, they grew quieter.

ADA Club Secretary Elizabeth Schumacher set up her laptop and played three song options for the group. As the music played, the interpreting students emerged once more as they danced and signed in their seats.

Students built off one another’s energy. They smiled at each other, signing rapidly with the music. No one was still while listening to the music.

“Once you’re actually signing, you get in your element,” Ally Miller said.

Sophomore interpreting major Amity Malmquist could not contain her passion. She danced to each song while signing the lyrics. Other students swayed, bobbed their heads, tapped their feet and signed choreography suggestions.

The votes were tallied after the third song. The winning song was “This is Me” from the 2017 movie “The Greatest Showman.” ADA Club members discussed their plans for starting the song with a solo dancer and gradually adding more dancers from the back of the recital hall throughout the song.

Group songs are enjoyable for Deaf and hearing audience members because the song will play over the loudspeaker while the dancers sign the lyrics. Schumacher will oversee the tech lighting and sound.

In addition to group songs, Burst of Sign provides food, performances and raffles for items donated by local businesses and people.

Burst of Sign will take place from 7-9 p.m. on Friday, April 27, and Saturday, April 28, in Kresge Recital Hall. Tickets are free with an Augustana ID or $5 at the door. Learn more about the event .

The money raised from ticket sales will be used to fund scholarships for interpreting students, Naomi Miller said.

The interpreting students encourage everyone to attend Burst of Sign, regardless of signing ability.

“It’s really cool,” Cain said, signing as she spoke. “It’s an opportunity to step out of your comfort zone and experience a new culture.”

Teaser/Lede

In planning for the upcoming Burst of Sign event, members of Augustana’s Deaf Awareness Club find an opportunity for creative expression and community building.

Date

April 9, 2018

Lede Image

Access and Relatedness

News & Events See Also: Burst of Sign Features Augustana Deaf Awareness Organization

Sign Language Interpreting

Augustana University Names Josh Morton Director of Athletics

In the News: Augustana Grad Named Director of Zeal Center for Entrepreneurship

DSU hires new VP for institutional advancement

Dakota State University has hired Bob Preloger as interim vice president for institutional advancement. Recently retired from Augustana University, Preloger will be leading both the DSU Foundation and the communications and marketing department.

Augustana University Names Josh Morton Director of Athletics

email

facebook

linkedin

twitter

google+

pinterest

Contact text

Kelly Sprecher

Director of Media Relations

605.274.5526

Ryan Sweeter

Director of Athletic Communications

605.274.5200

Body

Josh Morton has been named Director of Athletics for Augustana University.

Morton, who most recently served as an assistant athletics director for Michigan State University, was introduced by Augustana University President Stephanie Herseth Sandlin at a news conference on Friday, April 6.

Watch

Watch a replay of the news conference “Josh Morton already has the spirit of a Viking,” said Herseth Sandlin. “From serving as a walk-on quarterback for one of the University of North Dakota’s conference championship teams, to leading an award-winning television sports department for a major ABC affiliate, to, most recently, helping Michigan State build unprecedented support for its student-athletes, Josh has spent his career building pathways to help the teams he serves succeed.

“His passion for creating exceptional student-athlete experiences, his extensive leadership and communication skills, his proven experience in athletic fundraising and budget management, and his desire to make a difference in the lives of others make Josh Morton the perfect choice to serve in this very important role.”

— Stephanie Herseth Sandlin

Augustana University President

Morton succeeds Slade Larscheid , who stepped down earlier this year to spend more time with his family.

Morton said Augustana’s reputation for excellence, its culture and its people drew him to the role.

“I’m excited for the chance to join an outstanding institution revered for its academic excellence, its core values, its commitment to research and discovery, its vibrant performing and visual arts programs and, without a doubt, its best-in-class athletic programs,” he said. “I’m looking forward to being a part of this campus community during this extraordinary time in Augustana’s storied history, and to create a home in the great city of Sioux Falls with my family.”

At the news conference, Morton discussed the three principles his leadership philosophy will focus on: the student-athlete experience, engaging with the Augustana community and winning with integrity.

“The student-athlete experience is about all aspects of our students’ lives — academically, in the community socially, in competition and (preparing them for their) careers,” he said. He went on to explain his desire to build and foster relationships with members of the Augustana community who are on campus, as well as Viking alumni and fans around the world.

About Josh Morton

Josh Morton has more than a decade of experience working in college athletics.

At Michigan State, he worked with alumni in Michigan and metropolitan areas of the western U.S. to build financial support for MSU athletics, capital projects, endowments and programmatic gifts, securing more than $23 million in major gift commitments in less than five years.

Working with head coaches in all of MSU’s 25 sports, Morton also served as the primary athletics fundraising liaison for head coaches in men’s and women’s track and field, men’s and women’s cross country and men’s and women’s swimming and diving.

He is an active member of the National Association of Athletics Development Directors (NAADD).

Prior to MSU, he served as an associate athletics director for the University of North Dakota where he was the liaison between the University and the architectural firm behind the UND High Performance Center. From 2009-2012, Morton secured more than $22 million in annual, major and planned gifts for UND athletics.

Before beginning his career in college athletics, he served as the sports director and sports anchor for WCIV-TV, the ABC affiliate in Charleston, South Carolina.

Born in Sioux Falls, Morton holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of North Dakota. He and his wife, Robin, are parents to Luke, Cale and Sara Jane.

Morton will begin his new role in early May.

Teaser/Lede

“His passion for creating exceptional student-athlete experiences, his extensive leadership and communication skills, his proven experience in athletic fundraising and budget management, and his desire to make a difference in the lives of others make Josh Morton the perfect choice to serve in this very important role,” said Augustana University President Stephanie Herseth Sandlin. Learn more about Josh Morton, Augustana’s new director of athletics.

Date

April 6, 2018

Lede Image

Access and Relatedness

News & Events See Also: In the News: Augustana Grad Named Director of Zeal Center for Entrepreneurship

King Named 2017-18 ASA Faculty Recognition Award Recipient

Alumni Event: AU Alumni Community Service Day

GOLD Twin Cities: Insight Brewing

Celebrating Retirements

Augustana University to Introduce Morton as Director of Athletics

email

facebook

linkedin

twitter

google+

pinterest

Body

Augustana University will introduce Josh Morton as Director of Athletics at a news conference set for 10:30 a.m. on Friday, April 6, in the Siverson Lounge (located inside Morrison Commons).

Morton, who most recently served as an assistant athletics director for Michigan State University, will be introduced by Augustana University President Stephanie Herseth Sandlin .

About Josh Morton

Josh Morton has more than a decade of experience working in college athletics.

At Michigan State, he worked with alumni in Michigan and metropolitan areas of the western U.S. to build financial support for MSU athletics, capital projects, endowments and programmatic gifts, securing more than $23 million in major gift commitments in less than five years.

Working with head coaches in all of MSU’s 25 sports, Morton also served as the primary athletics fundraising liaison for head coaches in men’s and women’s track and field, men’s and women’s cross country and men’s and women’s swimming and diving.

He is an active member of the National Association of Athletics Development Directors (NAADD).

Prior to MSU, he served as an associate athletics director for the University of North Dakota where he was the liaison between the University and the architectural firm behind the UND High Performance Center. From 2009-2012, Morton secured more than $22 million in annual, major and planned gifts for UND athletics.

Before beginning his career in college athletics, he served as the sports director and sports anchor for WCIV-TV, the ABC affiliate in Charleston, South Carolina.

Born in Sioux Falls, Morton holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of North Dakota. He and his wife, Robin, are parents to Luke, Cale and Sara Jane.

Teaser/Lede

Augustana University will introduce Josh Morton as Director of Athletics at a news conference set for 10:30 a.m. on Friday, April 6, in the Siverson Lounge (located inside Morrison Commons).

Date

April 5, 2018

Lede Image

Access and Relatedness

News & Events See Also: Augustana University Names Josh Morton Director of Athletics

In the News: Augustana Grad Named Director of Zeal Center for Entrepreneurship

King Named 2017-18 ASA Faculty Recognition Award Recipient

Alumni Event: AU Alumni Community Service Day

GOLD Twin Cities: Insight Brewing